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5 Steps to Stop Losing Sleep Over Money

Originally posted on the Christian Post on May 19

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5 Lessons to Raise Money Genius Kids

Originally posted on the Christian Post on April 28

To learn Biblical answers to your financial questions, you can #AskChuck @AskCrown your questions by clicking here. Questions used may be lightly edited for length or clarity.

Dear Chuck,

I was raised in a home in which my parents talked very little about money, and my husband’s family didn’t say much about it either. For our parents, money was a private matter. I feel like that led to some financial mistakes when I got out on my own, through some trial and error. My husband and I want to do things differently with our children. Where do we begin? And how should we change our instruction as our kids grow up?

Puzzled Parents

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7 Ways to Become More Content

Charles Spurgeon said, “If you are not content with what you have, you would not be satisfied if it were doubled.”

Contentment is an attitude of knowing God’s plan for your life, having the conviction to live it, and believing that God’s peace is greater than the world’s problems.

Today, many are discontented – not because they aren’t doing well but because others are doing better.

Worldly goals are robbing believers of contentment. Lack of peace, lack of spiritual growth and doubts about God are warning flags.

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Lessons From My Dad on Hard Work

My father taught me the value of hard work. He set me up in the parakeet business when I was just 15 years old. At one point I averaged 1,000 birds per month that I sold to pet stores.

I later worked in the oil fields and gave my Dad my checks to save for me. It was dangerous and dirty work. But, I survived.

At the time I only knew to treat people right and make my employer glad he hired me. But, what I learned helped me get to where I am today.

I gained confidence.

I gained skills.

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6 Ways to Prepare for Summer Vacation

Are you planning a summer vacation?

Allianz Travel Insurance reported that while fewer Americans planned to take a summer vacation in 2016, they would still spend $1,800 on average, making the total cost of summer vacation totaling nearly $90 billion.

Although vacations can be a wonderful time for family bonding and a break from the routine of work and school, the cost can be devastating if not well planned. Decide what you can spend without going into debt and ignore how the world tells you to vacation.

Here are some practical ways to have a wonderful summer vacation and save money:

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Mike Pence's Money-Saving Marriage Tip

Originally posted on the Christian Post on April 7

To learn Biblical answers to your financial questions, you can #AskChuck @AskCrown your questions by clicking here. Questions used may be lightly edited for length or clarity.

Dear Chuck,

Recently, Vice President Mike Pence has come under fire after a Washington Post profile of his wife Karen reported that the Vice President does not go out to dinner alone with any women, other than his wife, and that he does not go to events with alcohol without his wife along as well. I know that that cost of divorce can be high, but do you think this is necessary, in this day and age?

Just Curious

Dear Curious,

It is hard to imagine that some found Vice President Pence’s practice offensive and juvenile; however, his critics found a way!

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Preparing for Easter

We recognize good Friday tomorrow and Easter this Sunday. Regardless of how you choose to observe this holiday, may Christ be the center of your celebration.

The estimated spending on all Easter-related goods for 2016 was $14.6 billion. Of that, the amount spent on candy alone was estimated to be $2.1 billion. That’s a lot of chocolate bunnies, jelly beans, and peeps! Add in clothes, food, flowers, gifts, decorations, cards, and miscellaneous items, and you can see how this Christian holiday has warped into big business.

Over 300 years ago, Isaac Watts wrote the hymn,When I Survey The Wondrous Cross”. It’s one of my favorite hymns because it’s filled with the wonder of Christ’s sacrifice and the recognition of our need for Him.

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7 Ways to Save on Baby Costs

There are some alarming statistics about how much it costs to raise a child from birth to adulthood. Most of these numbers land somewhere in the $235,000 range, but that can be somewhat misleading.

Nevertheless, ask any parent if having a baby is cheap, and they’ll probably give you a nervous, exhausted laugh. Babies are expensive! On average, it costs $60 a month for baby clothes (with your first child). The average child will use somewhere around 3,360 disposable diapers in their first year of life alone, adding up to over $800 annually.

Beyond clothes and diapers, other major expenses include strollers and car seats, dirty-diaper-disposers, diaper bags, and a plethora of other baby gear. While there are some costs that you probably can’t avoid (doctor visits, bottles, etc.), Americans do tend to overspend when it comes to our kids.

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The Secret to a Fulfilling Life

“How do you spell ‘love’?” asked Piglet. “You don’t spell it….you feel it.” answered Pooh

Pooh knew what he was talking about! But, it took Harvard 75 years to prove it.

Melanie Curtin at Inc.com recently reported on the secret to leading a fulfilling life.

Harvard’s (Grant and Glueck) study tracked the physical and emotional wellbeing of poor men growing up in Boston and male graduates from Harvard. It required multiple generations of researchers, analysis of blood samples, brain scans, self-reported surveys and interactions with the men to compile their findings.

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The Biggest Financial Regrets of Americans...And How To Avoid Them

Catey Hill at Marketwatch.com recently reported, “Many Americans are filled with regrets – financial regrets.” In fact, 3 out of 4 harbor regrets, according to a recent survey by Bankrate.com.

Sadly, the biggest regret is not saving enough for retirement early enough. The other regrets in descending order are:

  1. Not saving enough for emergency expenses
  2. Taking on too much student loan debt
  3. Taking on too much credit card debt
  4. Not saving enough for children’s education
  5. Buying a bigger house than they could afford
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